Strange loops

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Sep 282016
 

In Steven Johnson‘s upcoming book, Wonderland: How play made the modern world, he includes a chapter on the connection between musical instrument design and technological innovation. In this episode of his Wonderland podcast, he asks how and why it is that some experimental sounds find their way into the musical mainstream. With special guests Brian Eno, Alex Ross, Caroline Shaw, Carla Scaletti, and Antenes.

Composer on a NASA mission

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Jul 122016
 

Composer Roland Kuit was recently interviewed on the prime time news program SBS 6 Hart van Nederland to discuss his Kyma sound explorations that will be launched into space on September 8, 2016 on NASA’s OSIRIS-REx mission to the near-earth asteroid Bennu.

While his music is being launched into space on September 8 2016, Kuit will be at the Kyma International Sound Symposium in Leicester, UK presenting his music and ideas along with filmmaker Karin Schomaker so you’ll have an opportunity to meet and talk with him at KISS2016.

Extreme sound design, radical electronic music & the coming hardware revolution

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Jun 272016
 

Extreme sound design, radical electronic music, and the impending hardware revolution — Darwin Grosse recently sat down with Symbolic Sound’s Carla Scaletti, and the resulting conversation took some unexpected turns. Listen to the full podcast on Darwin Grosse’s Art + Music + Technology podcast.

Kyma meets Buchla

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Feb 112015
 

Roland_Kuit_Buchla_200_EMS_Stockholm_7On February 25, composer/synthesis-researcher Roland Kuit will be broadcasting live and in stereo from EMS in Stockholm for the Dutch Concertzender Radio, demonstrating his work with Kyma and the Buchla 200 interacting with each other in EMS Studio 4.

At the heart of these compositions are the Kyma algorithms that Kuit uses to frequency-modulate the Buchla Complex Waveform Generator Model 259 which, in turn, is used as trigger function for the Sequential Voltage Source Model 243, thus exploring the intriguing area that lies between note triggers and wavetables. This sequential control voltage is controlling a second Complex Waveform Generator Model 259. And the audio of this Waveform Generator is used as the carrier for the 285e Frequency Shifter / Balanced Modulator. The 266e Source of Uncertainty modulates a third Complex Waveform Generator Model 259 and is used as modulation signal for the Balanced Modulator which is fed through 296e Spectral Processor for filtering. Finally the loop is closed by routing these algorithmic audio ‘sentences’ back to Kyma for Ring Modulation and quadraphonic placement.

Kuit is a frequent guest on the Concertzender where he’s often called in as a modular synthesis expert to explain various synthesis algorithms or to discuss music by some of the pioneers of electronic music.

EMS#1 will stream live on 25 February after which it will be available as a podcast from the Concertzender archive.

Improvisation Games

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May 022014
 

Jeffrey Agrell, educator/performer/composer and author of Improvisation Games for Classical Musicians, writes in his blog about a new experience he had recently: he performed with Mike Wittgraf who was processing his signal through Kyma and controlling the processing using a Wiimote + Nunchuck game controller.  Here’s an excerpt:

More video from their performance on youtube:

  1. http://youtu.be/k4F-ELZD4Yo 4:05
  2. http://youtu.be/NwRogbxIbyM 4:07
  3. http://youtu.be/lFBQV7wQXsI 5:59
  4. http://youtu.be/sRMazAfJVeM 4:53
Oct 252013
 

Composer John Balcom recently completed the score for a new documentary utilizing Kyma as his synthesis tool kit.  BIG SHOT, part of ESPN’s award-winning series 30 FOR 30, tells the story of John Spano’s notorious purchase of the New York Islanders hockey team – which, 4 months after it happened, was exposed as one of the biggest scams in sports history. Directed by Kevin Connolly (E from ENTOURAGE), the film offers the first ever interview with Spano. It’s a pretty incredible story — Newsday called it “a must-watch for anyone with an interest in the power of delusion — both of the self and of others.” The film will be premiering Oct 22nd at 8pm EST on ESPN, and will eventually be available on demand as well as Netflix.

Far more than a sports documentary, the film is, at its core, the story of how a con man pulled off an incredible scam, and much of Balcom’s music speaks to this part of the film. The main instruments used were harp, piano, percussion, and synth, with Kyma supplying most of the synth parts.

When asked why he uses Kyma, Balcom responds, “I find the sound quality second to none. It has become an invaluable tool for me and I find myself using it more and more in my projects.”

Welcome to This New World

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Jul 082013
 

For the better part of a decade, jazz pianist/composer Stanley Cowell has become increasingly intrigued with the challenge of incorporating live electronics into the context of acoustic jazz — not electronics for its own sake — but electronics that add something meaningful to the music. In Cowell’s latest album, Welcome to This New World (SteepleChase SCCD 31757) he fully embraces the use of real-time signal processing and synthesis; Kyma has subtly infiltrated nearly every track “in ways that excite and disorient and offer a new dimension to improvisation,” to quote Chicago-based jazz reviewer Neil Tesser.

Welcome to This New World is a live album, no overdubbing, no post-production magic; every performance you hear on the album can be replicated on stage in real time… and will be this July 15 2013 at 7:30 pm in Hartford’s Bushnell Park at a free outdoor concert sponsored by the Hartford Jazz society and simulcast live on WWUH FM.

Cowell’s Empathlectrik Quartet features Vic Juris (guitar) and includes Tom DiCarlo (bass) and Chris Brown (drums), both of whom studied with Cowell at Rutgers. According to Cowell, Kyma acts as the fifth member of the Empathlectric Quartet.

Welcome to This New World

AN OVERSEAS MEMORY eases you gently into the new world, with subtle, theremin-esque touches over jazz guitar, bass, piano. Relaxed yet precise, the music puts you by the water’s edge at sunset, with smooth dissolves through interesting rhythmic disintegrations and repeating downward major thirds.

By the time we arrive at track 2, TINGED, the coddling is officially over and we’re thrust into the brave new world, harmonically, rhythmically and timbrally. Each note is distorted by ragged amplitude modulation. The piano emits showers of particles and distorted accents in an easy BPM 90 with tricky beat displacements and slightly disorienting live pitch bending.

VICTIM is fun, fast and boppish (16th notes at BPM 60?), the piano processing takes on a vocal quality that sounds like spectral voices. Some of the solos venture into territory heard only at electro-acoustic music concerts. A guitar solo is doubled by a delayed, ghost guitar, and the piano stabs sounds, at times, completely electronic. The abrupt ending sizzles into a noise decay.

Jazz critic Neil Tesser describes describes VICTIM as “instantly traversing the gulf between post-boppish improvisation and post-post-modernism”. Yeah! With another “post” thrown in for good measure!

The exquisite DUO IMPROVISATION I is just piano and guitar processed through Kyma. The entire track is filtered through a time-stretched vocoder/RE on the spoken phrase: “We pray for peace”, repeating and elaborated through metric and harmonic modulations. On this track, Kyma functions as a third performer: a prism through which you hear the other two performers! Fluid and ever-changing, the phrase morphs into an insistent invocation for peace, before easing back into a contemplative ending. Reflective, haunting and beautiful, this track bears repeated listening to appreciate just how musically innovative it really is.

EMPATHLECTRIK is a Cowell neologism derived from “Empathy + Electric”. In this track, Kyma sounds are incorporated into the theme itself and, as Tesser observes, Kyma “enhances the improvisation without overwhelming it.” The piano moves in and out of subtle modulation, there are theremin-like touches on the guitar, arpeggiated piano clusters pitch-shifted up. It sounds like it’s been multi-tracked and processed, but it’s all live! The New World has arrived.

Live spectral analysis and resynthesis of the piano through the Kyma CloudBank provides shimmery prolongations of the guitar and piano pitches in INVERTISEMENT. A sudden shift to the dry piano sounds sounds so focused and new; it makes you realize that hearing the processed piano lets you hear the dry piano with new ears; you no longer take any sound for granted.

During the unprocessed interludes, you have a chance to reflect on and appreciate the economy and precision of Cowell’s playing. Complex and masterful, his playing remains disciplined and focused, even when veering off into timbral new worlds. There’s never an extraneous note or gratuitous ornament. Similarly, the seeming ease with which Juris’ fingers fly over the fingerboard evidences a calm serenity that can only come from years of practice and total mastery.

This track, like the others, is formally solid, notwithstanding the wild timbral excursions.

After the solos, a reprise of the shimmery clouds. The reason these electronics feel so organic is precisely because they emerge entirely from the acoustic performance. They’re not played on a sequencer or a synthesizer, they are played on a real acoustic piano and subtly processed through the electronics. Thus, the resulting sound feels totally different from a synthesized track.

Picking up the pace and the mood again is SUN BURN which Neil Tesser describes as “shades of Weather Report”. The piano resynthesis has a decidedly vocal flavor, suggesting a female vocalist doubling the piano. This would be a good one to listen to while cruising down the highway and includes a rock-worthy drum solo.

In DUO IMPROVISATION II, you are suspended, drifting through space, with gentle electronics and atmospheric processing. Washes of quick arpeggios and Debussy-esque scales are held together by a subtle G pedal drone.

ST CROIX opens with cheery island percussion and ostinati. Bubbly, liquid processing alternates with straightforward sections and the metallic overtones of an acoustic thumb piano, this is one to listen to through ear buds while strolling down summer streets downtown.

With WINTER REFLECTIONS, the desolation of winter returns. Dry snow swirling like dust across dark streets, and shivery scraping on piano strings and cymbals coalesce into the theme stated in guitar and conversationally commented on by the piano. A slightly melancholic piano solo w/ tremolo, recovers with a strong bass line leading into the next chorus. There’s a delightfully high-pitched, fast bass solo with some light touches from electronics, a reprise of solo in guitar with piano commentary, and it ends with piano string-scraping and thermin sounds.

WELCOME TO THIS NEW WORLD features octave doubling, unisons, swinging syncopations, subtly warped resynthesis and disorienting non-sinusoidal resynthesis that gives the piano a harpsichord-like quality. The Theremins and piano wire scrapes return. By now we are solidly in the new world.

Stanley Cowell and Kyma

Cowell’s fascination with electronic music was first ignited when, as a sophomore at Oberlin College, he heard a lecture by Karlheinz Stockhausen. Cowell was struck by Stockhausen’s observation that once any music is recorded, it becomes electro-acoustic music. Cowell kept coming back to that idea, throughout the 1960s as a jazz performer and into the 1980s as he turned more toward composition. It wasn’t until 1997 when, as a professor at Lehman College in New York, he had an opportunity to write a grant to purchase one of the early Kyma systems.

He’s been using Kyma in his music ever since, but it wasn’t until the new, more portable, Paca was released that he began taking it on the road. “It’s a sound design workstation,” Cowell says of Kyma, differentiating it from other computer programs or electronic keyboard instruments, “basically, if you look at every real-time device that does something to sound, Kyma does all of that.”

 

During the recordings (and in live performances) Cowell sends the guitar signal to the left Kyma input and piano signal to the right input. Juris has his own foot controllers, while Cowell controls and initiates Kyma Sounds from his MacBook Pro. (Bass and drums are not processed). The result is like nothing you have heard before. Yet it never loses its grounding in acoustic jazz. Welcome to This New World is new music that sounds like nothing you’ve heard before.

New Year’s Day with JPJ

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Dec 302012
 

On 1 January 2013, Fiona Talkington celebrates the New Year on BBC Radio 3 with special guest, multi-instrumentalist and Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones performing live in the BBC’s Maida Vale studios. On this special New Year’s installment of Talkington’s Late Junction, Jones plays acoustic piano, lap steel ukulele, and Kyma-processed electric mandolin and lap steel guitar.  The show will air Tuesday, 1 January 2013 at 23:00 on BBC Radio 3 (after which it will be archived on the website for one week).  Happy New Year!

 

John Paul Jones on BBC3

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Jun 142012
 

BBC Radio 3 Late Junction host, Fiona Talkington invited John Paul Jones (mandolin, bass, and Kyma) and Erland Dahlen (drums and electronics) into the BBC3 studios at 9 am and, although the two had never met prior to the session, she invited them to improvise 6 tracks together.  Nine hours and 6 tracks later, the two musicians called it a wrap, and you can hear the Kyma-enriched results when BBC3 broadcasts their session on June 21st 2012 at 23:00 UTC.

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